Mallrats (1995)

Mallrats

This week on Alcohollywood, we head back into the 90s, land of Weezer, plaid shirts, and ripped jeans as we (along with guest Nick) revisit the 1995 mall comedy Mallrats! This flawed throwback to hard-R teen sex comedies is the second film from Kevin Smith, and his first (and only) attempt to write and direct a major studio picture. Watching the film, it’s not hard to see why – Smith’s overly verbose dialogue is mumbled out by an ensemble of half-baked ‘90s actors, the director’s limited visual style makes the whole film look ugly, and it’s hard to watch all the comic book/film references that exist for their own sake. (Don’t even get us started on Jay and Silent Bob.) Nonetheless, we manage to take a good look at this flawed-even-for-Kevin-Smith-standards flick along with our custom cocktail and drinking game. Take a listen!

LISTEN HERE OR DOWNLOAD:

THIS EPISODE’S DRINK: Stinkpalm

Mallrats cocktail2 parts Three Olives Dude
1 part tequila
1 part limoncello
5 parts pineapple juice
1 part triple sec
1 part blue Gatorade

Combine in blender with ice. Pour in glass.

 

DRINKING RULES FOR MALLRATS:

  1. Whenever you hear profanity
  2. Every time a comic book reference is made
  3. Anytime the camera actually moves

FINISH YOUR DRINK WHEN:

Rene (Shannon Doherty) says, “What can I say? I love the retard.”

Join us next week as we try (and fail) to get rid of a bomb with the 1960s camp classic Batman: The Movie!

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About Alcohollywood Staff

The film staff of the film website/podcast Alcohollywood.

2 thoughts on “Mallrats (1995)

  1. Great Episode. I liked this movie mainly for Smith’s crude dialogue and nothing else. Yes the main characters should not get the girl at the end, but It’s never meant to be taken seriously. Keep up the great work

    1. Thanks for the comment! I agree that there are moments in Mallrats when Smith’s dialogue works (mostly out of Jason Lee’s mouth), but I thought this was just an ill-fitted cast for Smith’s wordplay; it works best when it’s coming out of Smith’s own mouth, or with the cast of Clerks or Chasing Amy.

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